Books to read

Warning: These books might contain shocking material for young people. Please be aware.

The temperature is rising,  trees are turning green, summerdresses are being dusted and icecream makes it re-entry.
What better time to spend your days outside with your feet in the grass and a book in your hand?

But perhaps the books I read give you chills, your icecream tastes bitter and the sunbeams feel like icicles. They are all true based and often take place in conflicted countries. In my save and cozy house I have no idea of all the troubles that reach far beyond the Dutch borders and that’s why I think it’s important to read and know about this.

These book below all touched me and are written by strong women who overcame many struggles, sometimes looked death in the eye.

worldmapbooks1a

3764130

  1. The bite of the mango.
    by Mariatu Kamara, Susan McClelland.As a child in a small rural village in Sierra Leone, Mariatu Kamara lived peacefully surrounded by family and friends. Rumors of rebel attacks were no more than a distant worry. But when 12-year-old Mariatu set out for a neighboring village, she never arrived. Heavily armed rebel soldiers, many no older than children themselves, attacked and tortured Mariatu. During this brutal act of senseless violence they cut off both her hands. Stumbling through the countryside, Mariatu miraculously survived. The sweet taste of a mango, her first food after the attack, reaffirmed her desire to live, but the challenge of clutching the fruit in her bloodied arms reinforced the grim new reality that stood before her. With no parents or living adult to support her and living in a refugee camp, she turned to begging in the streets of Freetown. As told to her by Mariatu, journalist Susan McClelland has written the heartbreaking true story of the brutal attack, its aftermath and Mariatu’s eventual arrival in Toronto where she began to pull together the pieces of her broken life with courage, astonishing resilience and hope.

51dyBgV6M6L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_2.A Woman in the Crossfire: Diaries of the Syrian Revolution.
by Samar Yazbek, Max Weiss (Translation)
A well-known novelist and journalist from the coastal city of Jableh, Samar Yazbek witnessed the beginning four months of the uprising first-hand and actively participated in a variety of public actions and budding social movements. Throughout this period she kept a diary of personal reflections on, and observations of, this historic time. Because of the outspoken views she published in print and online, Yazbek quickly attracted the attention and fury of the regime, vicious rumours started to spread about her disloyalty to the homeland and the Alawite community to which she belongs. The lyrical narrative describes her struggle to protect herself and her young daughter, even as her activism propels her into a horrifying labyrinth of insecurity after she is forced into living on the run and detained multiple times, excluded from the Alawite community and renounced by her family, her hometown and even her childhood friends. With rare empathy and journalistic prowess Samar Yazbek compiled oral testimonies from ordinary Syrians all over the country. Filled with snapshots of exhilarating hope and horrifying atrocities, she offers us a wholly unique perspective on the Syrian uprising. Hers is a modest yet powerful testament to the strength and commitment of countless unnamed Syrians who have united to fight for their freedom. These diaries will inspire all those who read them, and challenge the world to look anew at the trials and tribulations of the Syrian uprising.

6072643. When I Was a Soldier.
by Valérie Zenatti.
At a time when Israel is in the news every day and politics in the Middle East are as complex as ever before, this story of one girl’s experience in the Israeli national army is both topical and fascinating. Valerie begins her story as she finishes her exams, breaks up with her boyfriend, and leaves for service with the Israeli army. Nothing has prepared her for the strict routines, grueling marches, poor food, lack of sleep and privacy, or crushing of initiative that she now faces. But this harsh life has excitement, too, such as working in a spy center near Jerusalem and listening in on Jordanian pilots. Offering a glimpse into the life of a typical Israeli teen, even as it lays bare the relentless nature of war, Valerie’s story is one young readers will have a hard time forgetting.

 

51V7NW4PPEL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_

4.  The Sewing Circles of Herat: A Personal Voyage Through Afghanistan.
by Christina Lamb.
Twenty-one-year-old Christina Lamb left suburban England for Peshawar on the frontier of the Afghan war. Captivated, she spent two years tracking the final stages of the mujaheddin victory over the Soviets, as Afghan friends smuggled her in and out of their country in a variety of guises.

Returning to Afghanistan after the attacks on the World Trade Center to report for Britain’s Sunday Telegraph, Lamb discovered the people no one else had written about: the abandoned victims of almost a quarter century of war. Among them, the brave women writers of Herat who risked their lives to carry on a literary tradition under the guise of sewing circles; the princess whose palace was surrounded by tanks on the eve of her wedding; the artist who painted out all the people in his works to prevent them from being destroyed by the Taliban; and Khalil Ahmed Hassani, a former Taliban torturer who admitted to breaking the spines of men and then making them stand on their heads.

Christina Lamb’s evocative reporting brings to life these stories. Her unique perspective on Afghanistan and deep passion for the people she writes about make this the definitive account of the tragic plight of a proud nation.

51cExzT4AlL._SX340_BO1,204,203,200_5. The Girl with Seven Names: A North Korean Defector’s Story.
By Hyeonseo Lee.
An extraordinary insight into life under one of the world’s most ruthless and secretive dictatorships – and the story of one woman’s terrifying struggle to avoid capture/repatriation and guide her family to freedom.

As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee was one of millions trapped by a secretive and brutal communist regime. Her home on the border with China gave her some exposure to the world beyond the confines of the Hermit Kingdom and, as the famine of the 1990s struck, she began to wonder, question and to realise that she had been brainwashed her entire life. Given the repression, poverty and starvation she witnessed surely her country could not be, as she had been told “the best on the planet”?

Aged seventeen, she decided to escape North Korea. She could not have imagined that it would be twelve years before she was reunited with her family.
She could not return, since rumours of her escape were spreading, and she and her family could incur the punishments of the government authorities – involving imprisonment, torture, and possible public execution. Hyeonseo instead remained in China and rapidly learned Chinese in an effort to adapt and survive. Twelve years and two lifetimes later, she would return to the North Korean border in a daring mission to spirit her mother and brother to South Korea, on one of the most arduous, costly and dangerous journeys imaginable.

This is the unique story not only of Hyeonseo’s escape from the darkness into the light, but also of her coming of age, education and the resolve she found to rebuild her life – not once, but twice – first in China, then in South Korea. Strong, brave and eloquent, this memoir is a triumph of her remarkable spirit.

Share:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Eva is a Dutch fashion blogger based in Twente, the Netherlands. Eva runs her blog since 2015 and quickly grew into a edgy and streetstyle based fashion blog where you’ll also find social media tips and tricks. Eva is active on many social platforms like Instagram, Lookbook, Facebook, Pinterest, Blogsociety, Fashion Potluck and Bloglovin. This is one of the main reasons that her reach goes far. Even though she doesn’t consider herself to be a Dutch Influencer she has worked with Livera, Violet Hamden, Defshop, Jo Malone, Ice-watch, BenBits, Esprit, Innocent drinks and many other brand.

Eva is een Nederlandse fashion blogger uit Twente. Na haar blog lancering in 2015 groeide ze al snel uit tot een edgy en streetstyle fashion blog waar je ook social media tips en marketing tricks vindt. Eva is actief op menig social media kanaal waaronder Instagram, Lookbook, Facebook, Pinterest, Blogsociety, Fashion Potluck en Bloglovin. Dit is één van de redenen waarom haar bereik ver gaat. Hoewel Eva zichzelf niet als een Nederlandse influencer ziet heeft ze samengewerkt met Livera, Violet Hamden, Defshop, Jo Malone, Ice-Watch, Benbits, Esprit, Innocent drinks en vele andere merken.